About Thrud!

This is a page detailing who, what and why Thrud is Thrud.

 

Note, most of this has been copied from Wikipedia, until a better description can be sourced.

Thrud’s Origins

Thrud the Barbarian is a comics character created by Carl Critchlow in 1981. Although Thrud himself is a parody of Conan the Barbarian, particularly as depicted in the Arnold Schwarzenegger films, inspiration for the character’s adventures and adversaries has been drawn from several fantasy sources.

During the 1980s, a Thrud comic strip was a regular and popular feature in the roleplay and wargame magazine White Dwarf with Thrud’s grotesque and comic antics forming a memorable part of the magazine’s golden age. In 2002, continued interest in the character from role-playing enthusiasts and a desire to be free to experiment with a new artistic style prompted Critchlow to self-publish a series of award-winning full-length Thrud the Barbarian comics.

Since October 2002, Carl has continued to develop his new artistic style in several different 2000 AD stories, contributing to the success of Lobster Random in particular. While Critchlow’s use of muted palettes has been criticised, his style has received praise for being highly recognisable and unique.

 

Thrud’s Biography

An origin story for Thrud was printed in the Thrud the Barbarian Graffik Novel. The story tells of a group of mercenaries who, lost and searching for a pub, stumble across an abandoned baby in a deserted village. The mercenaries decide to raise the baby as one of their own, teaching him how to fight and drink beer.

At the age of five, Thrud is sent to Crom the Destroyer Orthodox Pagan Infants School, where he towers above the teachers and his fellow students. When one of the children shoots him with a pea shooter, Thrud’s reaction is to kill and maim twenty-seven pupils and three teachers, leading to his expulsion from the school. Choosing to return to the wilderness rather than his adoptive parents, Thrud lives alone until, one day, he stumbles across a hidden burial chamber. Finding a small helmet and a large axe, Thrud arms himself. Finding gold and gems, he decides to return to civilisation with his newfound wealth, quickly establishing himself a reputation as a violent warrior.

Many years later, Thrud the Barbarian becomes Thrud the King, but finds the mundane duties of kingship tiresome without opportunities to fight. To put a halt to Thrud’s constant mutterings of, “Kill! Death! Maim! Mutilate! Destroy!”, the wise men of his kingdom collect stories of heroism from around the land and read them to him long into the night.

Thrud’s involvement in Thrudball

Thrud the Barbarian is the centre piece of the fluff and theme of Thrudball. Thrud remains the copyright and property of Carl Critchlow, and is used on this website, event and merchandise with his express permission.